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Warm Weather Preparation

Hot weather

Daytime temperatures are expected to be 80°F and above.  Heat exposure can make you, children, and your pets feel sick.  The following are a few things that you can do to withstand the heat and stay safe.

 

Heat and the Elderly

People aged 65 years or older are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. People in this category must be given and reminded of the following information.

  • Stay in air-conditioned buildings as much as possible. Contact your local health department or locate an air-conditioned shelter in your area.
  • Do not rely on a fan as your primary cooling device during an extreme heat event.
  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you.
  • Don’t use the stove or oven to cook—it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates.

Seek medical care immediately if you have, or someone you know has, symptoms of heat-related illness like muscle cramps, headaches, nausea or vomiting.

Heat and Infants and Children

Infants and young children are sensitive to the effects of extreme heat, and must rely on other people to keep them cool and hydrated.

  • Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Seek medical care immediately if your child has symptoms of symptoms of heat-related illness

Heat and People with Chronic Medical Conditions

People with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information.

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Don’t use the stove or oven to cook——it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.

 

        Watch the video on How to Stay Cool in Extreme Heat

  • A message from Dr. Robin Ikeda, Acting Director of CDC's (Center for Disease Control) National Center for Environmental Health, on how you can prevent heat-related illnesses and deaths by staying cool, hydrated and informed.Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness.

 

We all love spending the long, sunny days of summer outdoors with our furry companions, but being overeager in hot weather can spell danger, ASPCA  (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) experts warn.